Destroy All Humans (PlayStation 4)

THQ’s Destroy All Humans reminds me a lot of Tim Burton’s rather good movie Mars Attacks!

In both the movie and the game, aliens are out to destroy the human race, both adhere to the little green man (kind of) appearance. With many of the human victims are bumbling simpletons ready to give into the alien invasion.

Overall, Destroy All Humans is a likeable remake of a mid-2000s game, albeit it one with humour that hasn’t entire stood the test of time.

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Carrion, Nintendo Switch reviewed

Carrion is a horror game with a twist: You are the monster in the dark, hunting the humans – not the other way around.

In a genre that the game’s makers have described as “reverse horror”, you control a red amorphous tentacled blob that escapes confinement in a secret research facility and must escape.

Carrion is Metroidvania in style, with the monster having to unlock doors to progress to the next location and that often involves backtracking to locations you’ve visited before and pulling levers that will unlock chambers in another area.

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Death Stranding PC review

Hideo Kojima’s Death Stranding is a game that polarised gamers when it came out and you had two camps. Those that saw it almost as the second coming as one of the best games they’d ever played.  Versus those that found it good looking game hindered by repetitive gameplay.

I never played Death Stranding on PlayStation 4, but did play Metal Gear Solid V on the console and wasn’t a fan. It just didn’t gel with me. I just didn’t get it.

It was with some trepidation that I agreed to look at Death Stranding on PC when asked by the esteemed editor of this fine publication. I was curious to see how it played on a PC with more powerful hardware than a PS4. Also how Guerilla’s Decima game engine – which was used in Horizon Zero Dawn – scaled to a PC. Where there are a wide range of hardware variables at play, unlike consoles which are standardised in their design and hardware.

I’m a few hours into Death Stranding – more than I’ve ever been for a Hideo Kojima game. I’m slowly making my way through Death Stranding’s off-the-chart world, and you know what? I actually think I’m starting to like it.

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West of Dead, [reviewed on PC]

West of Dead is one of those games where if at first you don’t succeed, then try, try, try again.

And believe me, you won’t succeed your first run. You’ll end up back at the bar where you always start every run, perhaps a little wiser, definitely a little deader.

A twin stick shooter featuring a dead protagonist cowboy with a flaming skull for a head

West of Dead is a procedurally generated shooter in the vein of Dead Cells. Death is a certainty and around just about every corner. The more you die, the more you get to grips with the nuances and fine details that make this game tick.

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The Bioshock Collection (Nintendo Switch)

This is not a review about the Bioshock Collection games in the sense that I will tread the now familiar narrative ground. Bioshock 1 and 2 and Infinite have graced numerous platforms since the first game appeared in 2007. So gamers don’t need to be schooled on what they’re about and what’s going on.

No, this review is purely to take in the technical spectacle that is The Bioshock Collection on Nintendo’s Switch handheld. Make no mistake: This is a port worth having on the Nintendo’s portable. Especially Bioshock Infinite, perhaps my favourite game in the series.

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Mafia 2 review (The Mafia Trilogy Definitive editions)

The Mafia franchise is one that has polarised gamers right from the very beginning, to say “things never change” here’s our Mafia 2 review.

You either liked it or you hated it but I have fond memories of playing the first Mafia on a PC.

Ultimately, with Mafia 2 Definitive Edition, 2K have done the bare minimum required and released it, which is disappointing. All eyes will be on the original Mafia at the end of August to see how that game fares with a new lick of paint. 

Our fingers are collectively crossed and we’re all holding our breath. As the state of that Mafia will seal the fate of this so-called Definitive collection.

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Lonely Mountains Downhill (Nintendo Switch)

Lonely Mountains Downhill began life as a Kickstarter project by German game makers Daniel Helbig and Jan Bubenik.

Full disclosure here: I backed the project and my name’s in the game’s credits. It also got a mention in my pick of 2019.

As an ageing mountain biker the game appealed to me as a way to enjoy one of my passions. When I’m stuck at home and the weather’s too horrific to don the rain jacket and hit the trails. I was also attracted by its low-poly graphical style, with a blocky, chunky biker and vibrant environments.

Thanks to Lonely Mountains Downhill on Switch, I can now “ride” my mountain bike any time I want. At the office, while I’m lying in bed, while I’m, ahem, in the bathroom. It’s also the perfect thing for when I just can’t bothered kitting up and hitting my local trails. Especially with winter looming and its inevitable wet & chilly weather.

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Fledgling Heroes (Nintendo Switch), Byte sized review

Side-scrolling game Fledgling Heroes is bright, colourful, easy to play – and I’m having a great time with it, despite not being the target demographic.

Most likely aimed at young children due to its bright and cheerful visuals, Australian developer Subtle Boom’s Fledgling Heroes first appeared on the Apple Arcade but now it’s on Nintendo’s platform.

It’s reminiscent of that Flappy Bird game that was all the rage a few years ago but it’s much better, with a charming visual style.

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Cloudpunk: Tripping the neon-lit fantastic

Cloudpunk is what I’d imagine the offspring of movies Blade Runner and The Fifth Element would look like – if Blade Runner & The Fifth Element got cozy for a night, that is.

Hear me out on this one. Take Blade Runner’s dystopian and neon-lit bleakness and The Fifth Element’s chaotic driving and downright craziness and you’ve got their offspring: Cloudpunk.

A damn good looking child, if I say so myself, that I’m sure it’s parents (ionlands) would be so proud of what it has achieved.

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Saints Row IV Re-Elected (Nintendo Switch)

The Saints Row series has never pulled its punches and Saints Row IV Re-Elected is no different.

Any game that has an opening sequence featuring the future president of the United States climbing the exterior of an intercontinental ballistic missile as it soars into the stratosphere or has the aforementioned future president strutting through his suburban house as the star of his own sitcom called Leave it to the Saints, with a jaunty 1950s wholesome soundtrack in the background as he munches pancakes and fetches the paper is one that you know doesn’t take itself too seriously. All hail, Mr President.

And so it is with Saints Row IV Re-Elected (originally reviewed in 2015). A game you could rightfully call the anti-Grand Theft Auto thanks to its humour firmly tongue-in-cheek.

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